All posts filed under: Adult

Fireside favorites : 10 of my favorite 2020 reads

Welcome back to another Bookending Winter post! Today’s prompt is hosted by Lauren and Becky @ Northern Plunder. Bookending Winter is a book blogging event run by Clo and Sam, in which different bloggers host a couple of prompts each during the month of December. Anyone who wants to participate can register on the announcement post, make 3 (or more) posts during the event, and link them up on the challenge spreadsheet so others can find them easily! Prompt Explanation : Take a look back at your favorite reads of 2020. Hopefully these will make it to someone else’s TBR for them to pass the time whilst snuggled in with a hot coco next to the fire. At the beginning of 2020, I set my Goodreads challenge to 52 books – one a week, I thought, was perfectly attainable, seeing as I used to read a lot more than that, and my current classes at the time weren’t that time-consuming. 52 books, I reasoned, was a perfectly adequate challenge, and one I’d surely be done …

The Deep, by Rivers Solomon

This is going to be a short review, for a short book – but an excellent one !  The Deep is a novella (less than 200 pages) written by Rivers Solomon, and published in 2019. It’s shelved in adult science-fiction and fantasy on Goodreads, but I didn’t know anything about the plot when I borrowed it from the library : I just saw the cover, thought it looked nice, and decided to give it a chance. This was completely different from anything else I’ve read this year so far, and I definitely don’t regret it. Synopsis  Yetu holds the memories for her people—water-dwelling descendants of pregnant African slave women thrown overboard by slave owners—who live idyllic lives in the deep. Their past, too traumatic to be remembered regularly, is forgotten by everyone, save one—the historian. This demanding role has been bestowed on Yetu. Yetu remembers for everyone, and the memories, painful and wonderful, traumatic and terrible and miraculous, are destroying her. And so, she flees to the surface, escaping the memories, the expectations, and the …

Family Trust, by Kathy Wang

I finally had the time to read Family Trust, by Kathy Wan, during the #AGameOfBooksathon readathon ! I’ve been seeing that book everywhere for such a log time now, and to be honest, now that I’ve read it, I’m a little disappointed. I almost didn’t want to write a review, because so many people had a good opinion of it and I felt like it just didn’t live up to the hype. Some reviewers recommended it to readers who liked Crazy rich Asians, (which I loved, and reviewed here) and most of the reviews I saw before getting it myself were really positive, so I had great expectations. Synopsis Meet Stanley Huang: father, husband, ex-husband, man of unpredictable tastes and temper, aficionado of all-inclusive vacations and bargain luxury goods, newly diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. For years, Stanley has claimed that he’s worth a small fortune. But the time is now coming when the details of his estate will finally be revealed, and Stanley’s family is nervous. What I liked Kathy Wang’s writing is really good, …

Until the day I die

As a rule, I don’t read thrillers. The ones I’ve read so far were not enjoyable, either absolutely terrifying or completely boring, and some even gave me actual nightmares. But Until the day I die, written by Emily Carpenter and published today (March 12) is the exception to this rule. With half the book set in a beautiful spa resort in the middle of the Caribbean, and two women protagonists who deal with loss and grief in the only ways they can, I just had to give this story a chance. It did not disappoint me. The story begins pretty simply : Erin, her husband, and their two friends designed and created a revolutionary app that helps millions of people around the world budget their expanses, send money, check their savings accounts and plan for the future – and the future is bright. Until the day Perry, Erin’s husband, dies tragically in a car crash. Four months later, Erin is barely holding on, and her friends and family convince her that some time away from …

So, there’s a whole book of “oh no” comics.

Even if the name Alex Norris doesn’t ring a bell, if you have any sort of access to the internet, you’ve probably read some of his comics in the last few years. Since 2016, he has been the creator and illustrator of the now famous “oh no” comics, all of which have the same sad, disillusioned and disappointed catchphrase – and yes, people love to read them. Now, the London-based comic artist is publishing a book made of 110 independent comics from his Webcomic Name series, featuring an easy-to-identify-with pink blob moving through life, one disappointment after another. The design of the comics is pretty simple, and the repetitive catchphrase could get old very quickly, but thanks to a good amount of self-awareness, it doesn’t, and manages to stay hilarious from start to finish. Some of those panels are just plain fun (like someone’s complete failure at following a fancy recipe), and some are serious, tackling topics like the absence of motivation to do a task you really want to do, but… just can’t, or …